Final Power Rankings 2012-13

DKC is proud to release our final set of Power Rankings for the 2012-2013 season. The current totals are based on all tournaments held to date. In policy debate the teams are ranked based on total number of wins with speaker points breaking ties. In student congress places are determined by performance at all tournaments.

We hope to see all students on this list at Awards Night May 8th at the Kaufman Conference Center! Congratulations to all!

Top 20 Middle School Student Congress

  1. Arrowhead , Luke Hogue
  2. Arrowhead, Suan Sona
  3. FLA, Lucy Mulholland
  4. Lee A. Tolbert, Jared Hoskins
  5. Arrowhead, Colin Barnes
  6. ee A. Tolbert, Areanna Boyd
  7. FLA, Andrew Valdivia
  8. Center, Ellie Jensen
  9. Arrowhead, Alex Calderon
  10. Lee A. Tolbert, Josiah Hoskins
  11. Arrowhead, DeAuan McClaine
  12. Smith Hale, Muhammad Aadil
  13. Center, Queen Warrior
  14. FLA, Aaron Baker
  15. Lee A. Tolbert, Erica Hall
  16. Lee A. Tolbert, Zion Piper
  17. Sumner, Michelle Tinoco-Morales
  18. Sumner, Marley Low
  19. FLA, Tyree Brown
  20. FLA, Cale Mueller

 

Top 5 Middle School Policy Debate Teams

  1. Barstow, Jaelan Trapp & Alex Wang
  2. Sumner, Taylor Holmes & Trevian Stewart
  3. Barstow, Spencer Walz & Eli Pearce
  4. FLA, Max Keeney & Joe Green
  5. Center, Angel Mauro & Johnny Tancredi

 

 

Top 10 Middle School Policy Debate Speakers

  1. FLA, Max Keeney
  2. Barstow, Eli Pearce
  3. Barstow, Alex Wang
  4. Barstow, Spencer Walz
  5. Sumner, Taylor Holmes
  6. LATCA, Tariq Nash
  7. Sumner, Alexis Fant
  8. Center, Johnny Tancredi
  9. Sumner, Trevian Stewart
  10. FLA, Xavier Freean Edwards

 

Top 5 Varsity High School Policy Debate Teams

  1. Lincoln Prep, Jared Freemon & Corey Fisher
  2. Lincolon Prep, Hanna Rose Keneally & Frankie George
  3. Lincoln Prep, Monica Propst & Ellen Baker
  4. University Academy, Taylor Stephenson & Kyla Gilmore
  5. Patton Jr. High, Mathew Reinhold

 

Top 5 Varsity High School Policy Speakers

  1. Lincoln Prep, Jared Freemon
  2. Lincoln Prep, Frankie George
  3. Lincoln Prep, Hanna Rose Keneally
  4. University Academy, Kayla Gilmore
  5. University Academy, Taylor Stephenson

 

Top 5 Novice High School Policy Debate Teams

  1. University Academy, Zakiyah Allah & Demetrius Sterling
  2. Patton, Lawson Smead & Jacob Levine
  3. Patton, Alex Konczkey & Maddie Baker
  4. Wyandotte, Prince Johnson & Aminah Muhammad
  5. University Academy, Raven Nevels & Shawndrea Magee

 

Top 10 Novice High School Speakers

  1. University Academy, Shawndrea Magee
  2. Patton Jr. High, Lawson Smead
  3. Wyandotte, Aminah Muhammad
  4. University Academy, Demetrius Sterling
  5. Wyandotte, Gary Bradley Lopez
  6. Patton Jr. High, Jacob Levine
  7. University Academy, Tia Jackson
  8. University Academy, Raven Nevels
  9. Patton Jr. High, Alex Konczkey
  10. Wyandotte, Cantece Ridgwell

 

Top 5 High School Student Congress

  1. Sumner, Thalia Hernandez
  2. Wyandotte, Gary Bradly Lopez
  3. Sumner, Jessica Kile
  4. Sumner, Deonte Minor
  5. Lincoln Prep, Derrick Parker

 

Top 5 Equity Debate Speakers

  1. Washington, Willie Tolon
  2. Washington, Josh Baker
  3. Washington, Phillip Jones
  4. Patton, Alex Konczey
  5. Patton, Lawson Smead

 

 

Sumner Results & Coach Profile. Jamelle Brown: Making Debate a Family

Guest author: Rhiannon Dickerson

During this winter’s snowpocalypse, one of DKC’s major debates was postponed. The hard work of DKC coaches and students was in danger; they prepare all season for these debates. Sensing its importance, Sumner Academy coach, Jamelle Brown stepped forward and offered to host the make-up tournament at her school (see full results from the March 28th competition below). This is not the first time she has exceeded expectations. In her sixteen years of tenure as a DKC coach, Jamelle has mentored hundreds of students.

Ms. Brown’s relationship to debate is not new. She was once a debater herself, and said that the activity “helped [her] define and realize” her talents. She began her career in high school under the tutelage of Mrs. McClure who now volunteers for DKC at University Academy. The two women often see each other at tournaments. The influence of debate has shaped generations of thinkers, as is evidenced by Coach Brown’s story.

She first taught and coached debaters at Wyandotte High School in 1997 and later moved to Sumner Academy.  When she started coaching at Sumner, the school only offered high school students the opportunity debate. Ms. Brown spearheaded the program’s expansion to middle school students with the support of DKC and has been both the middle and high school head debate coach ever since. She has also created a varsity mentoring program.  Ms. Brown says of the program,
“I have a phenomenal group of varsity debaters who love coaching our middle school team!  It allows my high school debaters to learn some valuable skills including patience and humility.  They have “adopted” our middle school debaters and take their job as team coaches very seriously.”

Like all good leaders, Ms. Brown knows the importance of a community support and involvement. She navigates her experience as a mother in the same way she does coaching and teaching. She credits a supportive husband for making possible her tireless dedication to debate. “I always tell people” says Brown, “that I have over 200 children. I only get to claim three of them on my taxes.” Her children are part of the DKC community as well, sitting in at tournaments, and even participating as debaters. Let’s just say that Jamelle Brown lives what she teaches working nights and most weekends in pursuit of her passion.

When Ms. Brown volunteered to host the make-up tournament last month, she did so because she believes in the power of debate. “I enjoy seeing students grow and fall in love with debate and forensics” Brown says. “My greatest passion is to see students “get it” for the first time.” She sees debate as a “privilege” and fights to make sure her students and her children have access to it!

“We’re always talking about the DKC family,” says Isaac Allen, “Jamelle is a coach who really makes debate a family.”

See the full results from the tournament here:

Top 5 Policy Teams

  1. Sumner, Trevian Stewart & Taylor Holmes
  2. Sumner, Alexis Fant & Faith Davis
  3. Hogan, CAntae Kaid & Reggie Glenn
  4. FLA, Anna Crawford & Marybeth Eddy
  5. FLA, Xavier Freeman & Percy Bailey

Top 5 Policy Speakers

  1. Sumner, Taylor Holmes
  2. FLA, Max Kenney
  3. FLA, Xavier Freeman Edwards
  4. FLA, Anna Crawford
  5. Sumner, Faith Davis

House A

  1. Arrowhead , De’Auan Mclaine
  2. Sumner, Marley Lowe
  3. Lee A. Tolbert, Arieanna Boyd
  4. Coronado, Jamie Holst
  5. Central KCK, Alan Rosales

House B

  1. Arrowhead, Luke Hogue
  2. Lee A. Tolbert, Zion Piper
  3. Sumner, Jasmine Brown
  4. FLA, Lucy Mulholland
  5. FLA, Tyree Brown

House C

  1. Sumner, Michel Tinoco Morales
  2. Arrowhead , Alex Calderon
  3. Lee A. Tolbert, Josiah Hoskins
  4. Turner, Eli Rowden
  5. Turner, Travis Horne

House D

  1. Arrowhead, Suan Sona
  2. Hogan, Olayemi Sowemino
  3. FLA, Amitta Bryant
  4. Frontier School of Innovation, Blakely Mathis
  5. West, Navaeh  Jackson

House E

  1. Lee A. Tolbert, Jared Hoskins
  2. Arrowhead, Colin Barnes
  3. Sumner, Aliyah Shaw
  4. FLA, Taylor Corn
  5. Sumner, Ajhanae’ Franklin

 

Power Rankings!

DKC is proud to release our second set of Power Rankings for the 2012-2013 season. The current totals are based on all tournaments held to date. In policy debate the teams are ranked based on total number of wins with speaker points breaking ties. In student congress places are determined by performance at all tournaments.

Congratulations to all students who made the list!

Middle School Student Congress

  1. Arrowhead, Luke Hogue
  2. Arrowhead, Suan Sona
  3. Arrowhead, DeAuan McClaine
  4. Lee A. Tolbert, Areanna Boyd
  5. FLA, Lucy Mulholland
  6. Arrowhead, Colin Barnes
  7. Arrowhead, Alex Calderon
  8. Lee A. Tolbert, Erica Hall
  9. Lee A. Tolbert, Zion Piper
  10. Sumner, Michelle Tinoco-Morales
  11. Frontier School Innovation, Katelyn Hechkeroth
  12. Lee A. Tolbert, Josiah Hoskins
  13. Lee A. Tolbert, Jared Hoskins
  14. FLA, Mary-Beth Eddy
  15. Sumner, Marley Low
  16. Hogan Prep, ARya Pratt
  17. Lee A. Tolbert, Shayana Davis
  18. Center, Joanna Mileva
  19. Center, Raquel Hill
  20. Coronado, Jamie Holst

 

Top 5 Middle School Policy Debate Teams

  1. Sumner, Taylor Holmes & Trevian Stewart
  2. FLA, Max Keeney & Joe Green
  3. Center, Angel Mauro & Johnny Tancredi
  4. FLA, Percy Bailey & Raul Gonzalez
  5. Barstow, Spencer Walz & Eli Pearce

Top 10 Middle School Policy Debate Speakers

  1. FLA, Max Keeney
  2. Barstow, Alex Wang
  3. Barstow, Eli Pearce
  4. Barstow, Spencer Walz
  5. Sumner, Taylor Holmes
  6. Sumner, Alexis Fant
  7. Sumner, Trevian Stewart
  8. FLA, Xavier Freean Edwards
  9. Center, Johnny Tancredi
  10. Lee A. Tolbert, Tariq Nash

Top 5 Varsity High School Policy Debate Teams

  1. Lincoln Prep, Jared Freemon & Corey Fisher
  2. Lincolon Prep, Hannah Rose & Frankie George
  3. Lincoln Prep, Monica Propst & Ellen Baker
  4. University Academy, Taylor Stephenson & Kyla Gilmore
  5. Patton Jr. High, Mathew Reinhold

 

Top 5 Varsity High School Policy Speakers

  1. Lincoln Prep, Jared Freemon
  2. Lincoln Prep, Frankie George
  3. Lincoln Prep, Hannah Rose
  4. University Academy, Kayla Gilmore
  5. University Academy, Taylor Stephenson

 

Top 5 Novice High School Policy Debate Teams

  1. University Academy, Zakiyah Allah & Demetrius Sterling
  2. Patton, Lawson Smead & Jacob Levine
  3. Patton, Alex Konczkey & Maddie Baker
  4. Wyandotte, Prince Johnson & Aminah Muhammad
  5. University Academy, Raven Nevels & Shawndrea Magee

 

Top 10 Novice High School Speakers

  1. University Academy, Shawndrea Magee
  2. Patton Jr. High, Lawson Smead
  3. Wyandotte, Aminah Muhammad
  4. University Academy, Demetrius Sterling
  5. Wyandotte, Gary Bradley Lopez
  6. Patton Jr. High, Jacob Levine
  7. University Academy, Tia Jackson
  8. University Academy, Raven Nevels
  9. Patton Jr. High, Alex Konczkey
  10. Wyandotte, Cantece Ridgwell

 

 Top 5 High School Student Congress

  1. Sumner, Jessica Kile
  2. Sumner, Deonte Minor
  3. Wyandotte, Gary Bradly Lopez
  4. Sumner, Thalia Hernandez
  5. Lincoln Prep, Derrick Parker
  6. Wyandotte, Prince Johnson

 

Top 5 Equity Debate Speakers

  1. Washington, Willie Tolon
  2. Patton, Alex Konczey
  3. Washington, Phillip Jones
  4. Patton, Lawson Smead
  5. Patton, Mathew Reinhold

 

KC Star Article: KC student, debate partner bring home national titles

 KC student, debate partner bring home national titles

April 3, 2013 

BY JOE ROBERTSON

The Kansas City Star

Elijah Smith (left) Ryan Wash (right) greeted as champions. SHANE KEYSER — KANSAS CITY STAR

EMPORIA, Kan. — For anyone who was there, or watching the video online, it sure looked like Ryan Wash was in full grip of his moment in history.

The graduate of Kansas City’s Central High School had six minutes left in a two-hour debate to help his Emporia State University debate team do what had never been done before.

Two black men, bringing a fiercely personal style honed in urban debate leagues, were on the brink of winning the National Debate Tournament policy debate championship.

No all-black team had ever won that title before.

The duo, Wash and Elijah Smith, just days before had won the Cross Examination Debate Association championship.

If they were to win both titles, they’d be the first ever — black, white, urban, suburban, private-schooled or public-schooled — to pull off that feat.

“We are bringing debate home!” Wash shouted as he launched into the final rebuttal late Monday night at Weber State University in Ogden, Utah.

He was a fighter, smacking his fist into his palm. He ripped at his shirt. He pounded the table.

Their competitors in the final, from Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill., “want us to separate our theory from our flesh!” he screamed.

The Northwestern team had challenged the Emporia team’s whole approach, saying Wash and Smith were moving “dangerously” off the debate’s prescribed platform, energy production.

For years, urban debate teams have been radically testing the boundaries in a debate culture that they say rewarded the staid status quo, the middle class and elite.

Ryan Wash looking at his new championship trophy. SHANE KEYSER — KANSAS CITY STAR

Just as they might wade into research on environmental justice or global warming, the topic “energy production” could also spawn an argument against the debating process itself.

At the Cross Examination Debate Association championship at Idaho State University, Wash had summoned his tragic loss of his mother when he was 11, and his complacency in the face of alcoholism.

Only through debate had he found his voice, he said. That was his energy.

Many times over the years judges rejected such radical themes. To some, the idea of personalizing debates, even incorporating poetry and rap, made a sham of it.

But here they were, Wash and Smith, showing just how far the dogged debaters from inner cities have come. The moment was at hand when an urban-born team could be the first to win both titles.

“Today is the day we can unite the crowns!” he shouted. “We can connect to the elitest tournament of all!”

Gabe Cook, the director of the Debate-Kansas City urban debate league, watched online, seeing “Ryan make his historic argument.”

Jane Rinehart, the former debate coach at Central High School, had seen judges reject her students so many times over the years. But she also had seen great triumphs, and she sensed the moment as she watched online.

All those years watching her students, “I always knew they were good,” she said. “But (winning both of the national titles) seemed out of the realm of possibility.”

To see Wash bring the final argument home, Rinehart said, “was amazing.”

Were Wash and Smith thinking about the history in that moment?

“No,” said Wash.

“We were thinking only on the debate,” said Smith.

“You have to stay zoned in,” Wash added.

They were reliving it all Wednesday afternoon, back in Emporia, having received an indoor parade with championship banners through the student union at lunch hour.

Students and faculty lined the corridor, applauding and cheering while speakers overhead rang out with the school’s fight song. The school’s mascot, a hornet, led the way.

Some students raised fists with their little fingers crooked open — their hornet “stingers.”

They’re certainly relishing the history now.

Smith, a junior, had shown uncanny instinct and daring just being at Emporia to have this chance.

He had grown up in Newark, N.J., rising academically on the wings of urban debate and going to Rutgers University.

He became aware of Wash by reputation on the debate circuit. When he finally met him at one of the national tourneys, he sought out advice. They shared ideas frequently, sometimes on Skype.

Sam Maurer (head coach) Chris Logry (asst. coach) and Ryan Wash. SHANE KEYSER — KANSAS CITY STAR

Last fall, Wash knew that his debate partner at the time would not be back in the second semester. Wash needed a new teammate. Would Smith consider transferring to Emporia?

Smith came. “It was scary,” he admitted. And he had plenty of friends and family who were perplexed and even worried that he would leave New Jersey for Kansas.

There is no guarantee that two debaters tossed together will make a good team, Emporia debate coach Sam Maurer said.

But by their second debate earlier this year, Maurer said, “You could see the spark there. You could see the good rapport.”

They made a daring team, Maurer said, pursuing provocative arguments, and they were capable — as they showed in the championships — of hastily researching and developing a new affirmative argument in the course of a tournament, to catch opponents by surprise.

Maurer has coached several debate teams that came out of the urban leagues, and he thinks Wash and Smith’s triumph will help keep debate “salient to people at large.”

Urban debate leagues often struggle to stay strong, Cook said. Central High School, despite its rich history, doesn’t have a team at this time.

Debate teams give students a chance for structure and a chance for success they may not always find elsewhere, said Rinehart, who now leads debate teams part-time at University Academy charter school.

“When those voices are blocked out, they don’t have anybody to advocate for them,” she said.

The new champions would like it if their success inspires more students like them to walk into that debate room, or even start teams. There’s a good chance you will find your voice there, they said.

That doesn’t mean everyone will agree. Their victory over the Northwestern team was narrow. Three judges gave them the nod. Two thought Emporia’s team had strayed too far.

“One thing Ryan taught me,” Smith said, “is that debate is not worth it if you’re not saying what you truly want to say.”

This is what they fought for, Wash said.

“Everybody is welcome in debate.

“Debate can be home for you.”

 

You can a video interview from the Star with Ryan and Elijah here: http://www.kansascity.com/video/?token=V0Yd9K5GD8SpnnlhZIScVd73wtZ8QqLJsj 

 

 

Ryan Wash and Elijah Smith Win NDT & CEDA

Ryan Wash and Elijah Smith made history early Tuesday morning winning the final round of the NDT. For the first time ever college debate has an undisputed national champion. Winning both CEDA and the NDT isn’t something that anyone has ever done in the same year.  Not to mention Ryan and Elijah are the first all black team to win the NDT.  DKC is very proud of their hometown hero Ryan Wash and will be following and covering this story in detail.  In the mean time we wanted to say CONGRATULATIONS RYAN and ELIJAH! Both students are products of the urban debate movement and both students prove that with hard work anything can be accomplished

Coach Sam Maurer, Ryan Wash, Coach Christopher Loghry and Elijah Smith pose for a picture after their historic win in the final round of the NDT. They UNITED THE CROWN!

 

The Emporia crew reacting to the news they won it all!

 

The Emporia Crew Posing with the CEDA Trophy!